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APTN releases results of the first ever National Music Impact Study

Posted November 13th, 2019

Economic impact of Indigenous music is $78M to Canada’s GDP

Nov. 13, 2019, Winnipeg, Man. – APTN has just published the first ever National Indigenous Music Impact Study (NIMIS). This landmark Canadian study looked at the contributions made by the Indigenous music community and the impacts that this community has on the Canadian economy and on the social fabric of this country. The study also looked at the Indigenous music community’s challenges and successes. This study provides the most recent, best available data on any segment of the music industry in Canada.

APTN and its partners engaged with those involved in the Indigenous music community to conduct the study. This included anyone (Indigenous or non-Indigenous) who creates, promotes and supports Indigenous music in Canada. In total, 620 industry insiders completed the online survey and 70 interviews were held to gain unique insight into the industry.

Some of the key findings of NIMIS show that Indigenous music contributed a total of almost $78 million to Canada’s economy (GDP) and supports more than 3,000 full-time positions across the country. While the Indigenous music community is thriving, the Indigenous music industry, comprised of Indigenous-owned, Indigenous-directed music companies and supporting organizations, is still in its infancy and is poised for development.

To learn more about the Indigenous music industry and its impact on Canada, visit APTN’s NIMIS website for the full results of the study. Topics range from artist profiles to economic impact, outputs, funding barriers and recognized opportunities.

QUOTE
“APTN has always been a leading supporter of the Indigenous music industry in Canada. We set out to gain a better understanding of this group of professionals and what we found is that this industry has a significant impact on the economic and social fabric of Canada. However, the industry also faces challenges, which creates many opportunities for growth. We see this study as a starting point for in depth and informed discussions that will help the industry reach its full potential.”

–Jean La Rose, CEO of APTN

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APTN wishes to thank the following funders and organizations who have helped make this initiative possible:

• Canada Council for the Arts
• Canadian Heritage
• City of Toronto
• Creative BC and the Province of British Columbia
• Creative Saskatchewan
• ECMA
• Manitoba Film & Music
• Mi’kmaq Confederacy of PEI
• Music Canada
• Music-Musique NB
• MusicNL
• Music Nova Scotia
• Music Prince Edward Island
• Ontario Creates
• SOCAN
• Ulnooweg Development Group

Thank you, miigwetch, tansi, nakurmiik, merci to all of the Indigenous musicians and members of the Indigenous music community who took the time to share their perspectives and wisdom with us. This report reflects your collective voice.

About APTN
APTN launched in 1999 as the first national Indigenous broadcaster in the world, creating a window into the remarkably diverse mosaic of Indigenous Peoples. A respected non-profit and charitable broadcaster, it’s the only network of its kind in North America. The network is Sharing Our Stories of authenticity in English, French and a variety of Indigenous languages to approximately 11 million Canadian subscribers. With over 80% Canadian content, APTN connects with its audiences through genuine, inspiring and engaging entertainment on multiple platforms.

For more information, please contact:
Emili Bellefleur
Communications Manager, APTN
(514) 544-6124 ext. 227
ebellefleur@aptn.ca